Eklutna Glacier Change 1915 to 2010

Repeat Photography of Eklutna Glacier, Chugach State Park, Alaska (1915 – 2010)

Eklutna Glacier 1915
Eklutna Glacier in 1915, image taken by U.S. Geological Survey geologist Stephen Reid Capps.  Eklutna Glacier is located in the Eklutna Lake area of Chugach State Park, Alaska, United States. (1915 S.R. Capps/U.S. Geological Survey)
Eklutna Glacier in 1915, image taken by U.S. Geological Survey geologist Stephen Reid Capps. Eklutna Glacier is located in the Eklutna Lake area of Chugach State Park, Alaska, United States.

Eklutna Glacier 2010
Eklutna Glacier in 2010, image taken by Ron Karpilo.  Eklutna Glacier is located in the Eklutna Lake area of Chugach State Park, Alaska, United States. (© 2010 Ron Karpilo)
Eklutna Glacier in 2010, image taken by Ron Karpilo. Eklutna Glacier is located in the Eklutna Lake area of Chugach State Park, Alaska, United States. © 2010 Ron Karpilo

I plan to write a more detailed post about these images and several other posts with more information about Capps and his work and the other historic images that I’ve repeated over the past decade.

Please feel free to leave me a comment or let me know if you have questions. Follow me (@RonKarpilo) on Twitter for updates.

Update November 27, 2010
I just wrote a post about Stephen Capps and his 1915 Alaska geology fieldwork.

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5 Responses to Eklutna Glacier Change 1915 to 2010

  1. Marci says:

    In the 60’s, friends and I would camp near the glacier. There was no lake then, only a stream. We had to drive on a road similar to a jeep trail. There were no signs to direct you to the glacier, we only knew about it by word of mouth. The highlight of the trips was to walk into the mouth of eklutna glacier.

  2. Pingback: Repeat photography of Raven Glacier at Crow Pass, AK | Ron Karpilo

  3. Pingback: 1915 Alaska Geology Fieldwork by Stephen R. Capps | Ron Karpilo

  4. In the 1960s we drove our car to Mile 12.7 where we stash our bicycles today. After a hike of less than 1/2 mile, we could see the face of the glacier, which even back then was beginning to retreat back into the canyon. On May 14 of this year I hiked way back in there and saw the glacier’s face for the first time in more than 40 years! In my lifetime, it was receded about one mile. Since 1915, I’d guess it has retreated about 1-1-/2 miles.

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